If one were a cow, the only place you would want to live would be Uruguay.

Much like Arabs love their desert and sailors love their ocean, cows have to love this country. Those of us going to Salto on Monday, and there aren’t many of us, board the bus at twelve thirty in the Montevideo terminal and don’t see anything but green grass for the next seven hours. In many places it is knee deep, and, along the way, there are cows, horses, sheep doing what they do best – grazing.

The panorama is expansive rolling hills covered with green under a light blue canopy that supports puffs of white clouds drifting in a gentle wind like small sail boats.

You have cries of overpopulation yet we drive through thousands of acres of terra firma with water, the potential to raise unlimited cattle and  crops, and few people.

It is not like there isn’t money in the countryside. You see expensive farm equipment parked in front yards and they are the same expensive machines you find in Ohio or Kansas or Texas. You see nice vehicles and big houses on hills overlooking the highway that have impressive iron gates, tree lined entries, and panoramic views.

Along the way are rolling grass covered hills, wooded areas that grow timber harvested for several large paper mills in a world that is still not paperless. The government is working on the highway and we go through several toll booths that signal different provinces of the country. Little towns we drive through are trying to stay viable, trying to stay alive as their population ages, kids move away, storefronts shut down, and expenses of keeping city services continue to rise.

They should have named this country Greenland, but that name has already been drawn out of the hat.

Uruguay, despite Montevideo, is still best designed for cows.

 

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