Some got advice from Oprah and when she retired they lost their advice fountainhead. Some find guidance at church. Cable channels are replete with soothsayers, doom mongers, all around screwy prophets who have kind words out of one side of their mouth and dire warnings out of the other. News stands are packed with visions of financial collapse or piles of money waiting to be taken home in a wheelbarrow and all you have to do is buy the $99.99 wheelbarrow.

Some of us have simpler ways to get advice.

At China King, a Chinese buffet on Juan Tabo in Albuquerque, one of the girls brings my bill on a little plastic tray with my own personally picked Chinese fortune cookie.

 I open it with a slight crunch and carefully pull out a paper banner with words printed in light blue ink that are fuzzy.

” The answers you need, ” it reminds  me, ” are right in front of you. ”

I pay my bill and go back to work full and happy. Since everyone has advice, it shouldn’t be expensive. It is true you don’t have to travel far for answers.

It is knowing the right questions to ask that stops me cold in my tracks.

 

 

 

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