R.I.P. Getting a tan

 

 

Halloween creeps closer as leaves start to fall, pumpkins appear in windows, hot air balloons arrive for the annual Balloon fest in Albuquerque, creepy spiders turn up in school cafeterias and jackets become more than optional.

It is a sparkling day and these three skeletons, in an Albuquerque North Valley front yard, don’t dress up, worry about hair style or designer clothes. They  look content in their birthday suits without the excess weight, blemishes and imperfections that the rest of us have to carry wherever we go.

Next holiday season, I will set up my front yard like this too, but give my skeleton family a television to watch Netflix, game shows, soaps, or Dr. Phil.

In a few weeks this congregation will put on their Pilgrim outfits and be chasing turkeys around the yard with hatchets. A few weeks after that, they will be hanging Christmas lights in these front yard evergreens and singing carols by a manger,surrounded by animals and angels, Mary and Joseph, welcoming Baby Jesus to the planet nuthouse.

Bones keep popping up in Scotttreks, and, to be honest, we all need one day a year when creepy stuff camps in our front yard and ghosts and goblins have their say.

The last thought that hits me, between my ears,as I speed away in my car, is that if we had to wash each of our bones, our showers would take all day and family members would rightfully want to kill us.

R.I.P. is not bad advice, whether we are skeletons, or not.

 

 

 

 

Dinosaurs like to color too Another Charlie creation

 

 

Each day there are people and things to be colored.

Rainbows fade if they are not brightened up.

Flowers lose their delicacy in the hot desert sun and always need a make over.

Oceans take a slew of work to keep the best blue.

Dino, created by Charlie for a grand daughter, carries his own set of primary colors wherever he goes, ready to step into artistic action.

Dino is taking a road trip soon and will find himself  in a child’s bedroom on the other side of the country.

Late at night, he and his soon to be best friend, will hide under warm covers and color the world the way it should look all the time.

Dinosaurs don’t have to be the bad guys.

They can be our best friend too.

 

 

No B.S. Handwritten sign

 

 

ATM’s have become many people’s money solution.

They are in countries all over the world and you can get cash in countries where no one speaks English and all the writing looks like hieroglyphics. The ATM’s accept debit and credit cards, let you make deposits, check balances and transfer money across accounts.They are open twenty four seven and have small service fees. There is a phone number to call if something goes haywire but we all hope we don’t ever have to call because talking to customer service techs in India is dicey.

This simple, hand penned sign, by the ATM, is a plea for help. It was left leaning against a wall behind a trash barrel, so one guesses the writer got money and did take his Sister for a nice meal at the local Jack in the Box.

This sign promises your money will be spent on food rather than drugs, alcohol, cigarettes, or other vices.

Whether we should trust what we read, because the writer asks us too, is a great leap of faith.

The only thing that seems questionable in this plea for help are the letters, ” No B.S. ”

I wouldn’t have written that, if it was my sign.

When someone tells me ” No, B.S..” there is usually plenty of it that follows.

 

 

Get away from my register UNM South Golf Course snack bar

 

 

Bazookas are old technology but World War 2 vets will tell you a thing or two about their effectiveness in the war they fought in.

This plastic army man, with his bazooka pointed at me,his helmet securely fastened, his feet planted and secured by a heavy application of scotch tape, looks at me with a stern no nonsense attitude.

Mounted atop the snack bar register, he is protecting the money, and, throws me back to grade school days when we kids actually played with these Army men, taped firecrackers to them and stood back as they were blown up with the striking of a match.

These days, Army men still wear uniforms and helmets, but they have put their bazookas in museums. Army men, these days, are likely to be killing people with their computers, sitting in a room thousands of miles from the battlefield. 

This cash register is protected, and, at night, when employees have gone home, this army man goes to the refrigerator and helps himself to a beer.

Fighting makes one thirsty and there doesn’t seem any end to war.

 

Deer in Embudo Canyon Albuquerque Foothills

 

 

As soon as we say we haven’t seen any deer, we spot some.

This family unit nips leaves off branches, ears cocked, knowing we were here long before we spotted them. Animals, these days, have issues caused by us humans encroaching on their territories. There are a whole lot more of us these days than them.

I say a little prayer for them this morning as the sun comes over the Sandia’s and the humming of I-40 freeway traffic grows louder through Tijeras Canyon. It is currently bow hunting season and the bucks, not far from us, are at risk.

I pray hunters this year are lousy shots.

I don’t know, for sure, but I think I see a big buck pointing a big telephoto lens at me, getting closeups for his own Facebook page.

Going through a hunting season as the target isn’t rewarding but these guys and girls seem pretty nonchalant considering the price on their heads.

Hiking is always better when you see some nature.

We pass these deer, in peace, and I can almost hear their sigh of relief.

I’m not a deer, but even I too am wary of humans.

 

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